Signs of Times

“When He leaves the sanctuary, darkness covers the inhabitants of the earth. In that fearful time the righteous must live in the sight of a holy God without an intercessor.
The restraint which has been upon the wicked is removed, and Satan has entire control of the finally impenitent. God’s long-suffering has ended. The world has rejected His mercy, despised His love, and trampled upon His law.

The wicked have passed the boundary of their probation; the Spirit of God, persistently resisted, has been at last withdrawn. Unsheltered by divine grace, they have no protection from the wicked one. Satan will then plunge the inhabitants of the earth into one great, final trouble.
As the angels of God cease to hold in check the fierce winds of human passion, all the elements of strife will be let loose. The whole world will be involved in ruin more terrible than that which came upon Jerusalem of old.” The Great Controversy, Page 614

The Catholic ecumenical position is very simple: The separated brethren ought to accept the supremacy of the Pope. Protestants are no longer called ‘heretics’ by Catholics, and every Sunday, ecumenical worship services are held around the globe. Christian unity has become the focus of most Christian churches today.
The main aim of the Ecumenical Movement is to bring churches of all denominations, and ultimately, all other religious organizations together as One Ecumenical group or One World religion. Christian unity has become the focus of most Christian churches today. The current attempt of Christian churches to band together in things in which they hold common, is commonly referred to as “ecumenism.”
This word is defined as “the organized attempt to bring about the cooperation and unity of all believers in Christ.” The foundation for this ecumenical trend has been laid and built upon over many years.
We first saw the beginning of institutional ecumenism back in the 1960’s, with the formation of The World Council of Churches, which at first consisted of mostly mainline Protestant denominations. The largest Christian church, however, the Roman Catholic Church, with about 1 billion members, is still not officially a member of the World Council of Churches.
Until the 1960s, one could not really be a good Catholic and be ecumenical. In 1964, however, the Roman Catholic Church officially stepped into the ecumenical age. In that year, the second Vatican Council adopted the decree on ecumenism, which says that “all who have been justified by faith in baptism are incorporated into Christ; they, therefore, have a right to be called Christians and with good reason are accepted as brothers by the children of the Catholic Church.”
The decree also refers to non-Catholic Christians as “separated brethren.” The Catholic ecumenical position is very simple: The separated brethren ought to accept the supremacy of the Pope, and either become members of the Roman Catholic Church, or join hands and continue their existence as separate entities within the framework of a fraternal religious system.
Roman Catholic bishops from around the world met in an Ecumenical Council at the Vatican from 1962-1965. At that time they revised the Catholic liturgy, and have updated the church in several areas in an effort to bring the Protestants back into the fold. Protestants are no longer called ‘heretics’ by Catholics, instead attempt togetherness by distributing each year million of leaflets, entitled, ‘Week of Prayer for Christian Unity.’
Every Sunday, ecumenical worship services are held around the globe, and in 1991, for the first time in history, the Pope held an ecumenical service with two Lutheran bishops at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

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